Thursday, January 12, 2017

power steering, brake, and transmission fluid

Fluids I stopped buying and knowing about a long time ago.

Fluids I fixed leaks on a long time ago, and stopped having to top off all the time

But now a co-worker asked me about them, and if they are the same... and Bingo. I don't know any more.

Does Ford have some stupid specific trans and brake fluid?

Did Chevy go with a particular weird brake fluid no one else uses?

Why the hell after 70 years of hydraulic brakes aren't all car companies using the same Dot 3 (or whatever) brake fluid?

Does any car company have some specific power steering fluid requirement that no one else does?

Could be. I know that some company was using one oil that worked the engine and transmission all at once. So, it certainly isn't one for all, all using one. Of course, automatics and manual transmissions use different oils, lets just agree we don't need to bring that up ever again, it has no productive use in this conversation about specific car manufacturers requiring some fluid no one else uses for a brake or power steering system.



11 comments:

  1. Motorcraft Chemicals and Lubricants: https://www.fcsdchemicalsandlubricants.com/main/quickref.asp

    All-Makes Automotive/Light Truck Oil Viscosity/Capacity Charts and Oil Light Reset Procedures (.pdf): http://jameshalderman.com/images/Halderman_oil_change_chart_12-4.pdf

    All The Facts on OEM-approved and licensed Automatic Transmission Fluids: http://atfonatf.com/

    National Oil and Lube News 2016 Speciality Motor Oil Guide (.pdf): http://www.noln.net/sites/default/files/survey/online_motor_oil_guide.pdf

    The short answer is to follow the vehicle manufacturer's recommendations for fluid types and service intervals...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. right, but, it makes no sense for them all to recommend some company that paid them the most for an endorsement. I understand it, but seriously, shouldn't we be past all that? We have a robot on a comet for pete's sake

      Delete
    2. Engineers specify what works best. One-size-fits-all doesn't work. The automakers would like it to just as much as you and I would, but it's not that easy.

      GM even specifies a particular brake fluid in certain trucks to quell a squeaking noise when the brakes are applied - there's a TSB on it.

      Delete
    3. WHOA! A squeak is fixed by the brake fluid chemistry? That ain't making sense. A squeak, is a noise, is a vibration caused by two materials coming in contact. But brake fluid is a closed system, if changing the fluid stops the materials from contacting each other, you've been putting brake fluid between moving parts... which would seem to mean that the brake fluid is getting out of the system

      Delete
  2. Power Steering Fluid Types Recommended by OE Manufacturer: https://www.cardone.com/docs/default-source/product-pgs/psfluidtypes.pdf?sfvrsn=16

    ReplyDelete
  3. http://artsautomotive.com/publications/5-shop/78-genuine-fluids/ Wish the pictures were still up...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But I was not asking where to look up the answers. That's what google is for. I was asking the general questions, not the specific

      Delete
    2. The general answer is that if one type of fluid (brake, coolant, etc.) worked in all makes and designs the manufacturers would use it. In the real world it isn't that simple. Long warranties, greater NVH (noise, vibration, harshness) awareness by vehicle owners, FMVSS (Federal Motor vehicle Safety Standards), emissions and CAFE (fuel economy) standards drive every aspect of vehicle design.

      The multiple links were meant to show all of the differences in what on the surface appears to be "mundane" fluids.

      Delete
    3. http://www.brakeandfrontend.com/gm-tech-tip-squeak-noise-on-brake-pedal-application/

      Delete
    4. It's not that simple... really? Power steering fluid? How many ways can they need to vary PSF? What could possibly require re-engineering PSF? I dunno Mike, you might be right... but steering fluid? Pumped, pressurized, and moving a steering gear.

      Delete