Saturday, April 25, 2015

I've never seen a wreck like this before

I found a new funny trucking Facebook page, and they point out ever stupid Swift driver too!


Suddenly, I have an excuse for snoring!




How Sterlings are made


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cow-Trucks-and-Chicken-Trucks/109694919201131?fref=nf

2 things I hadn't read about Barney Oldfield until now

By the end of year, he held every track speed record for one to fifty miles.

He won the 1914 Cactus Derby, an excruciating 671~ mile ofrroad endurance test from Los Angeles to Phoenix, and was crowned "Master Driver of the Universe."

http://www.firstsuperspeedway.com/sites/default/files/B_Oldfield_Green_Dragon.pdf

Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad steam engines at the Durango, CO roundhouse. Remarkable photo by Ryan Selvius, from Railroad Glory Days.

quick and easy to see where the least expensive gas is


Seems to coincide with where you're least likely to want to live due to climate, poisonous spiders and snakes, and alligators. Conversely, the most expensive gas is where the most jobs are, best climate, and no alligators (Except that non-conformist Florida, those people aren't southern, and can't figure out how to punch a vote card)

Found on https://blog.gasbuddy.com/

70 years of street racing, and So Cal still can't get one thing right, the only way to stop street racing is to have lots of drag strips... unfortunately, that is a lot of expensive real estate


Found on https://www.facebook.com/coolnvintage?fref=nf

It's been 6 nights since the last LA area street racing bust, and that proves that 70 years of the war on street racing has been a useless waste of time when simply making a couple dozen drag strips equally spaced throughout So Cal would have prevented most of the last 7 decades accidents, crashes, wrecks, and deaths. But try and point out the obvious to city mayors, council members, and govenors who cater to the real estate developers that pay for elections, instead of looking out for the good of millions of relatives of drag racers who would rather have raced on cool drag strips without cops wrecking a good time

the tie rod from James Garner's 1970 Mexican 1000 race.

looks like this might be a useful addition to a non-electric wheelchair, can anyone comment on how well it works/.



found on  https://www.facebook.com/InterestingThingsDaily2014?fref=nf

If you've used it and can share your opinion, that would be great!

For Pat Dougherty, necessity and invention were discovered as close to home as it gets. “As an incomplete quad, I’ve always used a manual wheelchair,” says Dougherty, 52, of Boise, Idaho. “Around eight years ago, I was in my backyard trying to play ball with my kids on the grass. It was a pain. My front casters kept sinking in, and I just couldn’t push worth anything on grass. I figured there had to be a solution.”

A Hewlett-Packard employee at the time, Dougherty just wanted to solve this one issue for himself. “I figured that putting a larger wheel upfront that could be put on and off would work,” recalls Dougherty. “So, ironically, I used the materials from an old bike rack to make my first prototype. It didn’t work well, but it proved what I was looking to do. By lifting my casters off of the ground and rolling on a large front wheel, I could propel on tougher terrain.”

Dougherty became passionate about his one-man project. When he wasn’t at work, he was behind his home computer drawing concepts. “The more I thought about it, the more I thought that if it could solve my need, it could solve others’ needs,” Dougherty says. “I needed a large front wheel that could be installed and removed easily by the user.” It was then that Dougherty learned an invaluable lesson as an inventor: “Keeping things simple is the hardest part. I knew that I had to find a way that a quad like me could attach and remove the wheel. But how could I do that?”

Pat Dougherty invented the Free- Wheel so that he would have an easier time playing in the backyard The challenge was how to attach a large front wheel that lifts the front casters off of the ground. After all, how do you lift the casters off the ground, and add a front frame with a wheel on it, while still in the chair? “It was one of those light-bulb, ah-ha moments,” says Dougherty. “I realized that by angling the fork stem geometry, I could use the wheel itself for leverage. By mounting the wheel attachment to the footplate with the wheel in the rearward direction, when I pushed forward and pivoted the fork, it naturally lifted the casters off of the ground and off I went. The FreeWheel was born.”

Dougherty refined his design by using it around the HP campus. He also discussed his invention on Internet message forums. International demand was immediate. “I made 25 that first year in my garage and shipped them to users around the globe,” he says. “Users loved it, and I used their feedback to make it better. You have to listen and know your market.”

Dougherty now runs the company full time with a staff and his twin brother. With a retail price of $599, and insurance coverage by the VA and other insurers internationally, the FreeWheel is among the best-selling ultralight wheelchair accessories of all time, allowing users to convert an everyday ultralight wheelchair for hiking, exercise or around-town travel.

http://www.newmobility.com/2014/09/stories-of-invention/

Not that anyone else remembers, or wonders, but the Ghostbusters car was a 1929 Whippet



http://filmationghostbusters.wikia.com/wiki/Ghost_Busters_Car

a live-action children's television series that ran in 1975, about a team of bumbling detectives who would investigate ghostly occurrences. Only 15 episodes were created.

1970 Dodge dealership

Speed Buggy, looked like a Scooby Doo rip off, but was actually rewritten Josie and the Pussycats scripts


 The show was so successful that it aired on all three major networks.

Although closely patterned after the meddling kids characters of Scooby-Doo, some Speed Buggy episodes were actually reworkings of Josie and the Pussycats storylines

Found on https://www.facebook.com/That70sPage?fref=photo

Even Sears was selling Manx knock offs

the owner found the perfect backdrop at some grade school it looks like

70's skateboards from the Sears, JC Penney, or Montgomery Ward catalog

the cast of All In The Family, Sept 1973 arriving at CBS studios

Indian mini mini

70's original kit

Spiegel Christmas Catalog

Hurst decals I've never seen

late 50's early 60s taillight and tailfin test... difficult

http://www.americantorque.com/game/tailfins/

I got 45 of 56 correct, its really rare to see these Olds, Pontiacs, Buicks, DeSotos, and Packards

Evel Knievel, better at marketing than landing a jump