Sunday, April 14, 2019

old vs new... and now I can see why the old floats got holes in them... the brass is too damn thin, and the clip is so strong that it pierced the hollow float. That's just a bad design


the new one was only 40 dollars and made by, or at least supplied by Hoover Auto Parts, in Idaho. It's really similar to the original in nearly every way The filter is a little different, but there doesn't seem to be any significant changes from the 1967 design. So, that is cool.



Here's the original float, and the hole in it, the reason why it hasn't allowed the gas gauge to read any fuel in the tank for the past 16 years. 

4 comments:

  1. I assume however it does not fix the "problem" of the inaccuracy of the fuel gauge itself. The only thing I know when I read the fuel gauge on my 68 Coronet and 69 Charger is whether there is fuel or not in the tank. Everything else is random... and I have installed a volt stabilisator on the instrument cluster.

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    1. well, My last 69 Super Bee I had from 1995-2002, and the gas gauge was accurate enough... the issue never was a problem for me, the gas tank itself was leaking, and I replaced it and the float assembly, and was happy with the new ones.
      Most new cars seem to drive owners crazy with gas gauges, that the last gallon indicated goes 5 times faster that when the tank is filled, and seems to indicate full for a LOOOONGG time!
      I ran out of time yesterday to add fuel to the empty tank, so, checking the work for leaks, functioning gas gauge will happen this coming weekend or so

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  2. The fuel strainer held up pretty well, those often collapsed and caused all sorts of trouble, the quick fix was to blow some compressed air through the line and destroy the strainer altogether.

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    Replies
    1. Yes! That old filter is a champ! It's still pliable and untorn!

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