Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Religion in vehicles part 2... making the tractor acceptable to the ultra religious, by switching to steel wheels! (getting a 100 year old steel wheel tractor isn't such a useful idea I suppose) Thanks Marc!



The Groffdale Conference Mennonites don't drive automobiles, Nolt said. They travel by horse and buggy. Steel wheels ensure that tractors are not used as transportation, and that, is a reaction to when in the 1930s, tractor makers were trying to appeal to a broader catagory of farmer that might buy a tractor that was also able to drive into town.

you might recall my posts of those types of tractor truck/cars about 10 years ago http://justacarguy.blogspot.com/2008/06/1938-minneapolis-moline-model-udlx.html

or you might have instantly thought of my favorite, the Minneapolis Moline UDLX

Anyway, in Mitchell and Howard counties of Iowa, Mennonite ministers have allowed the practice of placing steel cleats/wheels on tractors and other self-propelled farm machinery, as a religious regulation of the Groffdale Conference Mennonite Church.

They explained it keeps their farms small, and it keeps families at home working together.

http://www.agrinews.com/archives/mennonites-say-there-is-good-reason-for-steel-wheels/article_439bbf98-f83b-58d8-8236-4ba5b1d87595.html

7 comments:

  1. Where I live in Pennsylvania the Amish use mules to work their fields.

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    1. And I'd guess that's the difference between religions

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  2. I've seen the largest of combines in the greater Mennonite held areas with steel tracks and steel wheels...

    Here in Central New York, we are seeing more and more Mennonite and Amish buying up old family farms in the rural areas...

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    1. Seems strange that so few people can make a living off a farm, but the Amish and Mennonite have never wavered. Maybe its the lack of modern tech expenses? But we know for sure they are honest hard working people, and we are surely blessed have such honorable and artistic people in this country.

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    2. Yes we are. One of the factors in the Amish farm ethic is that they do not borrow money. If they don't have the cash for it, they don't buy it. I know the Amish will get excommunicated for bouncing a check.

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  3. In Lancaster County PA, the Amish farming without machinery have smaller farms, and most of what they grow is used to feed themselves and their livestock. If they have extra it brings in cash to buy kerosene and essentials. The Mennonites who can use machinery can farm bigger areas and sell cash crops like corn, and tobacco, plus milk.

    A guy in MA I grew up with makes good money buying those steel wheels all over the country and selling them in PA.

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    1. As well as driving those 12 passenger vans to get the Amish from point a to point b.

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