Tuesday, September 12, 2017

a motorcycle produced in 1901, by W. Slinger, an electrical engineer from Settle, in Yorkshire, who took six years to complete the project.


J P Smith of Keighley riding his Slinger 1901 at the start of the 22nd Pioneer Run of the Sunbeam Motorcycle Club from Tattenham Corner to Brighton"

http://anyskin.tumblr.com/image/153216379347
https://occhiolungo.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/slinger.jpg



The rear of the machine appears much as a conventional bicycle, whereas at the front the normal wheel and forks were replaced by a small motorcycle with two small wheels and a De Dion engine between them. The engine was water-cooled with the radiator surrounding the cylinder. It had a surface carburetor and coil ignition. Transmission was by chain to a countershaft and then by a second chain to the rear small wheel. For steering it had braced forks to the front assembly, and further linkage for turning the front wheel.

7 comments:

  1. Foundwith the help of Google: 1901 Slinger

    http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/smith-of-keighley-riding-his-slinger-1901-at-the-start-of-news-photo/3331811#23rd-march-1958-j-p-smith-of-keighley-riding-his-slinger-1901-at-the-picture-id3331811

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  2. A water cooled 5Hp 499cc DeDion engine fitted to a bicycle by Billy Slinger. No clutch, single speed. It would do 35 mph in 1901.

    another image:
    https://occhiolungo.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/slinger.jpg

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well I'm not Steve but this is Slinger motorcycle of mister W. Slinger. From I did find:

    "Slinger was a motorcycle produced in 1901, by W. Slinger, an electrical engineer from Settle, in Yorkshire, who took six years to complete the project.

    This contraption was a very peculiar looking tricycle with all three wheels in line. The rear of the machine appeared much as a conventional bicycle, whereas at the front the normal wheel and forks were replaced by a small motorcycle with two small wheels and a De Dion engine between them. The engine was water-cooled with the radiator surrounding the cylinder. It had a surface carburettor and coil ignition. Transmission was by chain to a countershaft and then by a second chain to the rear small wheel. For steering it had braced forks to the front assembly, and further linkage for turning the front wheel. Forward motion was relatively easy but reverse was similar to backing a car with a trailer attached."

    And this picture with description:

    "Smith of Keighley riding his Slinger 1901 at the start of the 22nd Pioneer Run of the Sunbeam Motorcycle Club from Tattenham Corner to Brighton."

    ReplyDelete
  4. The "COOL" factor is off the chart.

    ReplyDelete