Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Burnelli aircraft design, cheaper, safer, more fuel efficient... why aren't these being built, what does Boeing and the other major commercial airline builders have against it?




Burnelli News Story from http://justacargal.blogspot.com/search/label/Burnelli where Tere has more than one post that displays photos, engineering drawings, and lots to read to show that the basic flying wing design that has evolved or drawn inspiration from the 1921 Burnelli lifting body design is a damn good idea. Creat more lift with the body, have smaller wings, and you'll have less drag as well I imagine

The Old Motor http://theoldmotor.com/?p=5935 had posted this 1935 press photo back in Feb 2011, which is in great focus and close up of the fuselage. The 1934 Ford was underslung to demonstrate it's high altitude starting ability (would have been easier to have a press conference in high altitude Colorado mountains)
I think I've posted this image before, but it's lost in the archives if I did.


the above, though just a concept artists drawing, reminded me immediately of the Burnelli

3 comments:

  1. Two big problems:

    1.) All infrastructure at airports are built around "conventional" aircraft. Imagine the expense of redoing things for a new style of aircraft.
    2.) Airlines and the public are used to conventional aircraft. These aircraft would need to be sold (literally and figuratively) to both. Unfortunately, the current environment does not lend itself to procurement of new aircraft--conventional or otherwise.

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  2. The no. 1 problem is not a problem. Lifting Fuselage designs would easily fit into the current airport infrastructure. Major airports around the world reworked almost everything to accommodate the 380.
    Prob no. 2 is only a problem because of short sighted leaders of the few aircraft companies left. As for the public, they would welcome this design if they knew they would pay less in airfares, less for air freight fees and would survive an emergency landing in a field at less than 100 mph and almost zero possibility of a fire frying them in their seats. Also, new planes are being made and sold (leased) all the time from Boeing and Airbus. That is a no-problem, problem too. No problem. I'm workin' on it.

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